Web 3.0

Google CEO Eric Schmidt
He said that while Web 2.0 was based on Ajax, Web 3.0 will be “applications that are pieced together” - with the characteristics that the apps are relatively small, the data is in the cloud, the apps can run on any device (PC or mobile), the apps are very fast and very customizable, and are distributed virally (social networks, email, etc).

Web 3.0 is a term, which definition is not confirmed or defined so far as several experts have given several meaning, which do not match to each other, but sometimes it is referred to as a Semantic Web. In the context of Semantic Web, Web 3.0 is an evolving extension of the World Wide Web in which web content can be expressed not only in natural language, but also in a form that can be understood, interpreted and used by software agents, thus permitting them to find, share and integrate information more easily.

Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of first World Wide Web has coined the term Semantic Web. But the concept of Web 3.0, first entered among the public in 2001, when a story appeared in scientific article written by American Coauthored Berners-Lee that described this term as a place where machines can read Web pages as much as humans read them e.g. web connected bathroom mirrors, which can read the news coming through on the web.

One of the difficulties in explaining Web 3.0 is that, unlike the original Web browser or later Web 2.0 systems, Semantic Web technology tends to be an infrastructure technology

Emerging Web 3.0 applications use semantic technologies to augment the underlying Web system’s functionalities

Emerging Web 3.0 applications are enhancing search engines in interest in new ways. Architecturally, they all have one thing in common—they use semantics to augment the underlying Web system’s functionalities. When the semantics aren’t applicable, or where they fail to add value, the underlying application looks like a traditional Web or Web 2.0 site. But where the semantics can be useful, the new functionality adds some exciting oomph. And on the Web, a little oomph can lead to a lot of money

According to W3C, “the Semantic Web is a web of data. There is lots of data we all use every day, and it is not part of the web. I can see my bank statements on the web, and my photographs, and I can see my appointments in a calendar. But can I see my photos in a calendar to see what I was doing when I took them? Can I see bank statement lines in a calendar?
Why not? Because we don't have a web of data. Because data is controlled by applications, and each application keeps it to itself.
The Semantic Web is about two things. It is about common formats for integration and combination of data drawn from diverse sources, where on the original Web mainly concentrated on the interchange of documents. It is also about language for recording how the data relates to real world objects. That allows a person, or a machine, to start off in one database, and then move through an unending set of databases which are connected not by wires but by being about the same thing”.